Diversity

Diversity is the variety of elements.  This section covers the variety in New Jersey a wide range of categories including age, disability, ethnicity, origin, political belief, race, religion and sex.

National Rankings provide data on how New Jersey compares to other states on measures of Diversity.

State and Local Reports provide featured analysis of current data on Diversity within New Jersey and its role in the state.

 


National Rankings - compared to other states, New Jersey ranks...

• Last in Female Representation in Congress

January 28, 2014.  According to the Rutgers University Center for American Women and Politics, New Jersey is one of just 15 states that currently has neither a female representative nor a female senator in the U.S. Congress.  California currently leads the states in female congressional representation, with 18 congresswomen and both senators being female.  

• 9th in Number of African American Women in State Legislature

June 17, 2014. With 9 African American women serving in the New Jersey state legislature in 2013, NJ tied for the 9th largest number according to the Center for the American Woman and Politics at Rutgers University.  The other states New Jersey tied with were Texas, Louisiana, and Missoura.  Georgia has the most with 27 and ten states have none.

• Rutgers-Newark is the Most Diverse National University

2014.  As ranked by U.S. News & World Report using student body data from 2012-2013, Rutgers-Newark retains its position as the country's most ethnically diverse national university.  It has held this position since US News & World Report started the ranking. 

• 23rd Lowest in Race-Based Workplace Discrimination Complaints

2014. New Jersey workers filed 551 complaints of race-based workplace discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 2013. Adjusted for population size, this equates to 6.2 complaints per 100,000 members of the population, placing the state nearly in the middle of all states.  Adjusted for pouplation size, Mississippi had the most complaints with 32 compalints per 100,000 people.  Montana had the least with .3 complaints per 100,000 members of the population. 

• 18th Highest in Workplace Discrimination Complaints Based on National Origin

2014.   New Jersey workers filed 228 complaints of workplace discrimination based on national origin with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 2013. Adjusted for population size, this equates to 2.6 complaints per 100,000 members of the population, ranking the state as the 18th highest for such complaints.  As with race-based workplace discrimination, Montana had the best record, with no complaints at all based on national origin.  New Mexico hasd the most complaints, with 11 complaints per 100,000 members of the population. Mississippi had the most (population-adjusted) complaints with 32 compalints per 100,000 people.

• 5th largest Number of Naturalizations: 2011-2013

May, 2014.  According to the Department of Homeland Security's Office of Immigration Statistics, New Jersey ranked 5th in the total number of persons naturalized between 2011 and 2013 with 41,173 new Americans being naturalized in the state.  California took the top spot, with 164,792 new citizens over the same period, 21% of the U.S. total naturalizations. 

August, 2013.  In New Jersey 30.4 percent of the population over 5 years old spoke a language other than English according to the American Community Survey in 2011. California had the highest percent with 43.8 percent, and West Virginia had the least with 2.3 percent.

• 7th Largest Muslim Population 

2012.  According to the 2010 U.S. Religion Census of the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies, New Jersey had more than 160,000 muslim adherents living in the state in 2010.  It may come as a surprise to learn that Texas had the largest Muslim population amon the states, nearly 422,000.  Vermont had the smallest muslimg population, estimated at just 100 persons.

 


 

State and Local Reports

Gender Norm Attitudes In New Jersey

The results of a joint survey by the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NJCASA) and the Center on Violence Against Women and Children (VAWC) show wide variation in attitudes about gender. Differences were considered by age, race, gender, education, main source of news, marital status, language of interview, and area code.
 
Overview of the key results:
 
• Attitudes about Gender
 
o Greatest belief in traditional gender roles: men, those who are older, those who have only a high school education, widowers, those who completed the survey in Spanish, and those who receive most of their news from TV.
o Least belief in traditional gender roles: women, those who are younger, those who get their news from the internet, whites, those with a graduate degree, those who are married, and those who completed the survey in English.
 
• Attitudes about Media
 
o Great belief that gender inequality exists in media: women, those with a graduate degree and those who completed the interview in English.
o Least belief that gender inequality exists in media: men, those with a high school education, and those who completed the interview in Spanish.
 
• Attitudes about Bystander Behavior
 
o Greater willingness to intervene in bystander situations: women, those who get their news from books, those who are older, blacks, those with a graduate degree, those who are widowed, and those who completed the interview in English.
o Lower willingness to intervene in bystander situations: men, those who are younger, those get news from magazines, those in the ‘other’ racial category, those with a high school education, those never been married, and those who completed the interview in Spanish.

Read the full report

 

Additional Reports

Neiset Bayouth, "Marketing Identity, Negotiating Boundaries: Ethnic Entrepreneurship, Retail and Consumption in Paterson, New Jersey," Center for Race and Ethnicity Conference on Race and Retail, June 2012.

Sen-Yuan Wu, "New Jersey's Asian Population by Asian Group: 2010," NJ Labor Market Views, Issue 18, February 2012.

Sen-Yuan Wu, "People From Many Nations Form New Jersey’s Hispanic Population," NJ Labor Market Views, Issue 14, October 2011.

Karen Downing, University of Michigan, Why and How Diversity Matters in Libraries and on Campuses, presentation to the Diversity Research Center, Rutgers, March 2011.

Nelson Johnson, The Northside: African Americans and the Creation of Atlantic City published by Plexus Publishing, 2010.

Center for Health Statistics, Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, December 2007.

American Conference on Diversity, New Jersey: Statewide View of Diversity, September 2007.

 

 

Data from the NJ DataBank may be used with the following acknowledgement:

Source: NJ DataBank (http://njdatabank.newark.rutgers.edu), a project of the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University-Campus at Newark